Infrared Photography: Key West Cemetery

Infrared Photography Art by  Clay H. Wieland Photographer

 I became interested in using the “infrared photography” technique in high school with infrared film.  The original process was very sensitive to light, which is the very nature of the infrared spectrum.  The part of the light spectrum used is referred to as near-infrared to distinguish it from far-infrared, which is the domain of thermal imaging, light is passed through the lens and then through a special filter applied to the camera, which lets the infrared light pass through to the camera, but blocks all or most of the visible light spectrum. The film had to be handled in total darkness at all times.  It was only several years ago that I  re-discovered the infrared technique, however this time it was with a digital image instead of a film image. I converted a digital camera into an infrared camera only, which means that everything I photograph with that camera is  captured with the infrared technique.  I then process the digital image using various software to achieve the final images you see in this  display. I especially like the dark skies and bright white clouds that infrared photography produces in my Art.  I am amazed on how the process effects all types of  foliage giving the leaves a white transparent look.  I wanted to capture some of Fort Lauderdale’s local places in a “different light”, and I hope you enjoy viewing my images.

If you would like to learn more about the infrared photography process, contact me: info@claywielandphotography.com

                                                                                   

If you would like to learn more about the infrared photography process, contact me: info@claywielandphotography.com

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